This anchor – buried on the ocean floor for nearly 500 years – offers a tantalizing clue to where Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés’ lost fleet may be resting in the waters in the Gulf of Mexico. Carbon-14 dating from the anchor’s wooden stock indicates the tree was felled sometime between 1417 and 1530. Swipe to see the extraordinarily well preserved wooden stock and click the link in my bio for the full Nat Geo story. After nearly a month of surveying our target area of over 30 square miles with a Marine Magnetics magnetometer, and with only a handful of days left in our first field season, the @lostshipsofcortes team found the anchor while performing a circle search of an anomaly. The fluke of the anchor was the first thing uncovered during excavation, but the team didn’t start to get excited until the wooden stock was uncovered near the ring. Everything about the anchor was consistent with the type of anchor that Hernán Cortés would have carried on his ships. This does not mean that it is conclusively one of Cortés’ anchors, but it does provide a very compelling clue to continue the search! @insidenatgeo @natgeoimagecollection #archaeology #underwater #maritimearchaeology #shipwreck #adventure #exploration #underwaterarchaeology #scuba #scubadiving #diving #history #marinemagnetics

This anchor - buried on the ocean floor for nearly 500 years - offers a tantalizing clue to where Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés’ lost fleet may be resting in the waters in the Gulf of Mexico. Carbon-14 dating from the anchor’s wooden stock indicates the tree was felled sometime between 1417 and 1530. Swipe to see the extraordinarily well preserved wooden stock and click the link in my bio for the full Nat Geo story. After nearly a month of surveying our target area of over 30 square miles with a Marine Magnetics magnetometer, and with only a handful of days left in our first field season, the @lostshipsofcortes team found the anchor while performing a circle search of an anomaly. The fluke of the anchor was the first thing uncovered during excavation, but the team didn’t start to get excited until the wooden stock was uncovered near the ring. Everything about the anchor was consistent with the type of anchor that Hernán Cortés would have carried on his ships. This does not mean that it is conclusively one of Cortés’ anchors, but it does provide a very compelling clue to continue the search! @insidenatgeo @natgeoimagecollection #archaeology #underwater #maritimearchaeology #shipwreck #adventure #exploration #underwaterarchaeology #scuba #scubadiving #diving #history #marinemagnetics

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Climber, diver, adventurer, photographer, storyteller, member of the human race.

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